Ash Surgery

0151 727 1155 

Services provided

Anti-coagulant monitoring

Warfarin The purpose of anticoagulants is to slow down the body’s own clotting process, thereby reducing the risk of blood clots forming in certain high risk conditions: Atrial Fibrillation Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism Artificial heart valves or other heart valves disorders To be effective, warfarin must be administered to maintain a prescribed level of anticoagulation (measured by a blood test called “lNR”). Close monitoring of warfarin is required to maintain and not exceed this level of anticoagulation. Excessive anticoagulation could potentially put the patient at risk for unnecessary bleeding complications.

Blood tests are done regularly depending on the individual response to drug regimen and warfarin dosage is adjusted, as needed.

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Rheumatoid monitoring

The Ash Surgery has a dedicated team consisting of a GP, practice nurse and healthcare assistant, who provide monitoring for patients who are on Disease Modifying Drugs (DMARDs) such as; Methotrexate and Sulfasalazine etc for Rheumatoid Arthritis. The patients who have been taking these drugs for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or for any other conditions are eligible to join this clinic for regular blood test monitoring. We communicate regularly with the hospital rheumatology team if we have any concerns about patient’s condition, medications or blood results. All patients continue to attend their routine appointments with consultants for review of their arthritis.

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Family Planning

 

Family Planning at the Ash Surgery

We offer a full range of family planning and contraceptive services to all our patients, for an appointment please contact the practice.

The methods of contraception There are lots of methods to choose from, so don't be put off if the first thing you use isn't quite right for you; you can try another. You can read about each of the different methods of contraception by visiting these pages:

 

 

Sexual Health

We provide a wide range of family planning options including the contraceptive injection and implant.
We are also able to screen for most sexually transmitted infections including chlamydia, gonorrhoea, HIV and syphilis.
    Please ask your doctor or nurse.

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Smears

Cervical screening test, or smear test, is a method of detecting abnormal (pre-cancerous) cells in the cervix in order to prevent cervical cancer. The cervix is the entrance to the womb from the vagina.

Cervical screening is not a test for cancer; it is a test to check the health of the cells of the cervix. Most women's test results show that everything is normal, but for 1 in 20 women the test will show some abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix.

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Childhood Vaccinations & Baby Clinic

Baby Clinic

The clinic is run each Tuesday morning and is run by our practice nurses and supported by one of our doctors.

Our nurses have been responsible for these clinics since early 2016 following the restructuring of Liverpool Community Health.

Previously the clinics were run by a Health Visitor during which babies were also weighed. However for this service you will now need to attend a local clinic, the following link provides the necessary information.

 

http://www.childwallandwooltonchildrenscentre.co.uk/baby-weigh-in-clinic/

 

Vaccinations

8 weeks

5-in-1 vaccine – this single jab contains vaccines to protect against five separate diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (known as Hib  a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children)  

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine

Rotavirus vaccine

Men B vaccine

12 weeks

5-in-1 vaccine, second dose

Men C vaccine (DISCONTINUED from July 1 2016)

Rotavirus vaccine, second dose

16 weeks

5-in-1 vaccine, third dose

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, second dose

Men B vaccine second dose 

One year

Hib/Men C vaccine, given as a single jab containing vaccines against meningitis C (first dose) and Hib (fourth dose)

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, given as a single jab

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, third dose

Men B vaccine, third dose 

2-7 years (including children in school years 1, 2 and 3)

Children's flu vaccine (annual)

3 years and 4 months

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, second dose

4-in-1 pre-school booster, given as a single jab containing vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and polio

12-13 years (girls only)

HPV vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer  two injections given 6-12 months apart

14 years

3-in-1 teenage booster, given as a single jab and contains vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus and polio

Men ACWY vaccine, given as a single jab and contains vaccines against meningitis A, C, W and Y

Adult Vaccinations

65 years

Pneumococcal (PPV) vaccine

65 and over

Flu vaccine (every year)

70 years (and 78 and 79 year-olds as a catchup)

Shingles vaccine

Vaccines for special groups

There are some vaccines that aren't routinely available to everyone on the NHS, but that are available for people who fall into certain risk groups, such as vaccines for pregnant women, people with long-term health conditions, and healthcare workers.

Additional vaccines for special groups include:

Holiday Vaccinations (4 weeks notice is required)

If you're planning to travel outside the UK, you may need to be vaccinated against some of the serious diseases found in other parts of the world.

Vaccinations are available to protect you against infections such as yellow fever, typhoid and hepatitis A.

In the UK, the childhood vaccination programme protects you against a number of diseases, but doesn't cover most of the infectious diseases found overseas.

Which jabs do I need?

You can find out which vaccinations are necessary or recommended for the areas you'll be visiting on these two websites:

Some countries require you to have an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis (ICVP) before you enter. For example, Saudi Arabia requires proof of vaccination against certain types of meningitis for visitors arriving for the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages.

Many tropical countries in Africa and South America won't accept travellers from an area where there's yellow fever unless they can prove they've been vaccinated against it.

Read more about the vaccines available for travellers abroad.

Where do I get my jabs?

You should get advice at least eight weeks before you're due to travel, as some jabs need to be given well in advance.

First, phone or visit your GP or practice nurse to find out whether your existing UK jabs are up-to-date (they can tell from your notes). Your GP or practice nurse may also be able to give you general advice about travel vaccinations and travel health, such as protecting yourself from malaria.

Your GP or practice nurse can give you a booster of your UK jabs if you need one. They may be able to give you the travel jabs you need, either free on the NHS or for a charge.

Alternatively, you can visit a local private travel vaccination clinic for your UK boosters and other travel jabs.

Not all vaccinations are available free on the NHS, even if they're recommended for travel to a certain area.

Free travel vaccinations

The following travel vaccinations are usually available free on the NHS:

These vaccines are usually free because they protect against diseases thought to represent the greatest risk to public health if they were brought into the country.

Private travel vaccinations

You're likely to have to pay for travel vaccinations against:

Yellow fever vaccines are only available from designated centres.

The cost of travel vaccines at private clinics will vary, but could be around £50 for each dose of a vaccine. It's worth considering this when budgeting for your trip.

Things to consider

There are several things to consider when planning your travel vaccinations, including:

  • the country or countries you're visiting – some diseases are more common in certain parts of the world and less common in others 
  • when you're travelling – some diseases are more common at certain times of the year; for example, during the rainy season
  • where you're staying – in general, you'll be more at risk of disease in rural areas than in urban areas, and if you're backpacking and staying in hostels or camping, you may be more at risk than if you were on a package holiday and staying in a hotel
  • how long you'll be staying – the longer your stay, the greater your risk of being exposed to diseases
  • your age and health – some people may be more vulnerable to infection than others, while some vaccinations can't be given to people with certain medical conditions
  • what you'll be doing during your stay – for example, whether you'll be spending a lot of time outdoors, such as trekking or working in rural areas
  • if you're working as an aid worker – you may come into contact with more diseases if you're working in a refugee camp or helping after a natural disaster
  • if you're working in a medical setting – for example, a doctor or nurse may require additional vaccinations
  • if you are in contact with animals – in this case, you may be more at risk of getting diseases spread by animals, such as rabies

If you're only travelling to countries in northern and central Europe, North America or Australia, you're unlikely to need any vaccinations.

If possible, see your GP at least eight weeks before you're due to travel. Some vaccinations need to be given well in advance to allow your body to develop immunity. Some also involve multiple doses spread over several weeks.

Joint Injections

 The practice offers a joint injection service in which cortizone can be injected into or around a joint to alleviate inflammatory conditions.

   Any person wishing to obtain more information regarding this service should book an appointment with either Dr Johnson or Dr Miller.

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